Activism

Green Activism

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Like most, I’m very aware of global issues and feel obligated to help in some way. Because there is so much wrong with the world however, it’s difficult to decide where to focus my efforts. My natural response is self-preservation. Because it is no longer a case of if the system will crumble, but when. And when that time comes, or ideally long before; we need to be self-sustainable.

My method is to break it all down to our fundamental needs as humans and work out how to ensure that those needs are met in an increasingly unstable world. Having a proactive response to this then not only ensures future survival when the system starts to break down, but distances me from the system, contributing to it’s collapse. Hopefully documenting my efforts will aid and inspire others to do the same.

How is this relevant to my art practice? My art is and continues to be a creative response to my internal and external world. With age this response is becoming less transgressive and more pragmatic but still a powerful platform for change.

So, on that note….we are now warmly welcoming the start of summer. Time to put a green finger up to global production and mindless consumption by getting out in the garden

 

At One With the Opposition

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What do you do next when you completely deconstruct your creative ethos to nothingness? My focus changes frequently but this is usually because it has been superseded by a new interest. Now I’ve nothing but an empty void where there was once a cause.

My quandary comes from the realisation that activism creates conflict. It creates two sides existing in binary opposition to each other and this is the kind of separation that I have been campaigning against. Art Activism (or Action Art) wasn’t resonating with me anymore and now I understand why. I want to exist within a synchronised, harmonious environment not one where forces work against each other. It seems however that I am entering dangerous territory where everything is obscured by an idealistic, nauseating purple haze and smells of patchouli oil.

Without wanting to being a hippy about it, I am starting to feel that I should leave the world of angry, transgressive art behind and shift my focus to the promotion of oneness and synchronicity. And it will make for a refreshing change I’m sure.

Peace out.

 

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The Big Question: But is it art?

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Where does art stop and life start? In the ever expanding concept of art, artists face great scrutiny when their artwork doesn’t fit into the outdated conventional standards of aesthetics and commodity fetishism. It’s somewhat surprising considering the advances in technology; where we are surrounded by a virtual reality, that artwork that doesn’t take a material form is not more widely accepted such as the email, smart phones or video games seem to have been. People seem to be slightly more at ease if the artwork is categorised, such as performance or relational aesthetics. But surely creativity should take us out of the bounds of such titles.

 I suppose the one question is where do I think the line is between art and life? It’s definitely a blurred one. For a start, your life affects your art. Whether it’s your environment, your mood, the people around you and even how much money you have. Previously I have journeyed into my mind, extracting and dissecting parts of my subconscious. I turned myself into laboratory specimen, or a confessional artist as it’s known in the art world and opened myself up for all to see in a quest to find myself.

 On my journey, I certainly didn’t find myself, but I did find some potential to ease my suffering and this is what lead me into the next phase of my artistic practise; working towards a better world, internally and externally. I suppose if I had to classify what I do now, it is a form of relational art. Whilst before I was bringing about awareness of my internal to myself through confessional art, now I am bringing about awareness of our collective exterior world, through art activism.

To create art as a commodity would be a contradiction of what I stand for as an artist; an anarchist, an empath standing up against the forces of capitalism, consumerism and materialism. How I choose to present my art is dependent on what I intuitively feel my audience would to relate to on both a creative and informative level. So the output of my creative practise and what others would scrutinise over as they stumble over themselves in the question to define what art is, would be anything that meets the criteria of my message – an empathic protest with a wide and varied audience in mind.

Action Art….that’s it, I’ve decided….Now for some divine inspiration… 😉

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